Zadar Zadar

Zadar

Zadar is the oldest continuously inhabited Croatian city. It is situated on the Adriatic Sea, at the northwestern part of Ravni Kotari region. Zadar serves as the seat of the Zadar County and the wider northern Dalmatian region. The city proper covers 25 km2 (9.7 sq mi) with a population of 75,082 in 2011, making it the fifth-largest city in the nation.

The area of present-day Zadar traces its earliest evidence of human life from the late Stone Age, while numerous settlements have been dated as early as the Neolithic. Before the Illyrians, the area was inhabited by an ancient Mediterranean people of a pre-Indo-European culture. Zadar traces its origin to its 9th century BC founding as a settlement of the Illyrian tribe of Liburnians known as Iader.

In 59 BC, it was renamed Iadera, when it became a Roman municipium, and in 48 BC, a Roman colonia. It was during the Roman rule that Zadar acquired the characteristics of a traditional Ancient Roman city with a regular road network, a public square (forum) and an elevated capitolium with a temple.

After the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 and the destruction of Salona by the Avars and Croats in 614, Zadar became the capital of the Byzantine theme of Dalmatia. In the beginning of the 9th century, Zadar came under short Frankish rule and was returned to the Byzantines by the Pax Nicephori in 812. The first Croatian rulers gained control over the city in 10th century.

In 1202, Zadar was conquered and burned by the Republic of Venice, which was helped by the Crusaders. Croats regained control over the city in 1358, when it was given to the Croatian-Hungarian king Louis I. In 1409, king Ladislaus I sold Zadar to the Venetians. When the Turks conquered the Zadar hinterland at the beginning of the 16th century, the city became an important stronghold, ensuring Venetian trade in the Adriatic, the administrative centre of the Venetian territories in Dalmatia and a cultural centre. During this time, many famous Croatian writers, such as Petar Zoranić, Brne Krnarutić, Juraj Baraković and Šime Budinić, wrote in the Croatian language.

After the fall of Venice in 1797, Zadar came under the Austrian rule until 1918, except for the period of short-term French rule (1805–1813), still remaining the capital of Dalmatia. During the French rule, the first newspaper in the Croatian language, Il Regio Dalmata – Kraglski Dalmatin, was published in Zadar (1806–1810). During the 19th century, Zadar was the centre of the Croatian movement for cultural and national revival.

With the 1920 Treaty of Rapallo, Zadar fell under Italian rule and during World War II, it was heavily destroyed by the Allies. After the defeat of the Axis Powers, it was ceded to Croatia whose armed forces defended it in October 1991 from the Serb forces who aimed to capture it.

Today, Zadar is a historical centre of Dalmatia, Zadar County's principal political, cultural, commercial, industrial, educational and transportation centre. Zadar is also the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Zadar. Because of its rich heritage, Zadar is today one of the most popular Croatian tourist destinations, named "entertainment centre of the Adriatic" by The Times and "Croatia's new capital of cool" by the Guardian. In 2016, Zadar was named "Best European Destination" by the Belgian portal Europe's Best Destinations.com after a three-week period of online voting and more than 288,000 cast votes.

Zadar has a borderline humid subtropical (Cfa) and Mediterranean climate (Csa), since only one summer month has less than 40 millimetres (1.6 in) of rainfall, preventing it from being classified as solely humid subtropical or Mediterranean. Zadar has mild, wet winters and very warm, humid summers. Average annual rainfall is in excess of 917 mm (36.10 in). July and August are the hottest months, with an average high temperature around 29–30 °C (84–86 °F). The highest temperature ever was 36.3 °C (97 °F) on 4 August 2017.

Temperatures can consistently reach over 30 °C (86 °F) during the summer months, but during spring and autumn may also reach 30 °C almost every year. Temperatures below 0 °C (32 °F) are rare and are not maintained for more than a few days. January is the coldest month, with the average temperature around 7.7 °C (46 °F). On 23 January 1963, the lowest temperature ever in Zadar, −9.1 °C (15.6 °F), was recorded. Through July and August, temperature has never dropped below 10 °C (50 °F). October and November are the wettest months, with a total precipitation of about 114 and 119 mm (4.49 and 4.69 in), respectively. July is the driest month, with a total precipitation of around 35 mm (1.38 in). Winter is the wettest season, however it can rain in Zadar at any time of the year. Snow is exceedingly rare, but it may fall in December, January, February and less likely in March. On average, Zadar has 1.4 days of snow a year, but it is more likely that the snow does not fall. Also, the sea temperature is from 10 °C (50 °F) in February to 25 °C (77 °F) in July and August, but is possible to swim from May until October, sometimes even until November. Sometimes in February, the sea temperature can drop to only 7 °C (45 °F) and in July exceed 29 °C (84 °F).

Zadar region All Destinations

Zadar

149 Yacht

Zadar is the oldest continuously inhabited Croatian city. It is situated on the Adriatic Sea, at the northwestern part of Ravni Kotari region. Zadar serves as the seat of the Zadar County and the wider northern Dalmatian region. The city proper covers 25 km2 (9.7 sq mi) with a population of 75,082 in 2011, making it the fifth-largest city in the nation.

Biograd

305 Yacht

Biograd na Moru is a city and municipality in northern Dalmatia, Croatia and is significant for being the former capital of the medieval Croatian Kingdom. Its population is 5,569 (2011). Biograd is administratively part of the Zadar County. It is located on the Adriatic Sea coast, overlooking the island of Pašman, on the road from Zadar and Sukošan towards Vodice and Šibenik.

Pag

702 Yacht

Pag is a Croatian island in the northern Adriatic Sea. It is the fifth-largest island of the Croatian coast and the one with the longest coastline. In the 2011 census, the population of the island was 9,059. There are two towns on the island, Pag and Novalja, as well as many smaller villages and tourist places.

Premuda

702 Yacht

Premuda is a small island in Croatia, off the northern Adriatic coast. It belongs to the north Dalmatian islands, which are situated north-west from the county centre Zadar. Premuda is approximately 10 km (6 mi) long, up to 1 km (0.6 mi) wide and has an area of 9.2 km2 (3.6 sq mi). It is situated southwest of Silba and northwest of Škarda and is the last island before the Italian coastline.

Silba

702 Yacht

Silba is an island in Croatia with an area of 15 km2, located in northern Dalmatia, south-east of Lošinj, between the islands of Premuda and Olib. It has a Mediterranean climate with 2,570 hours of sunshine per year. Most summer days are hot, bright and clear with light westerly Maestral wind cooling the island in the afternoons.

Olib

702 Yacht

Olib is an island in northern Dalmatia, located northwest of Zadar, southwest of Pag, southeast of Lošinj and just east of Silba with an area of 26.14 km2. The population is 140.

Ist

702 Yacht

Ist is a small island off the Dalmatian coast of Croatia. The closest city to Ist is Zadar. The island has an area of 9.65 km2. Ist is located between the islands of Škarda and Molat.

Molat

702 Yacht

Molat is a Croatian island in the Adriatic Sea. It is situated near Zadar, southeast from Ist, separated by Zapuntel strait. It has an area of 22.82 km2 (8.81 sq mi).

Naložbo VAVČER ZA DIGITALNI MARKETING (izdelavo spletne strani ter rezervacijske platforme) sofinancirata Republika Slovenija in Evropska unija iz Evropskega sklada za regionalni razvoj.

EU MGRT SPS – Slovenski podjetniški sklad

We use cookies to provide you with the best service on our website. If you stay on our website, you consent to our Cookies Policy.